Google's Winning Doodle Is a Lesson in Self-Love for Black Children

Akilah Johnson's Doodle 4 Google Image

No day is a dull day for Google, as the company shape-shifts its logo into awesome new images for users to ogle over. However, this Google doodle in particular stands out -- this Google doodle (above) sends an empowering message to children of all backgrounds, but is without a doubt a message that is magnified for young African-American children.

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More inspiring than the image itself is the young woman behind it -- Akilah Johnson. Johnson was one of 53 state and territory winners who made it to the finals held at Google headquarters in Mountainview, California -- beating out 100,000 others (ranging from kindergarten to 12th grade) who submitted to the "Doodle 4 Google" competition. The students competed for a chance to win a $30,000 college scholarship and an additional $50,000 education-technology grant.

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Google asked students to consider, "What makes me, me?" -- and Johnson stood tall, proud, and unapologetic for her "Afrocentric Life." She was a voice for the black community and a beacon of hope for young black children -- proving to them that it is in fact okay to love the skin you're in, despite society often making us feel otherwise. 

Her image depicts a young black girl (with her natural coils sitting on top of her head), Africa, Nelson Mandela, and a "Power to the People" fist -- paying homage to recent causes, such as Black Lives Matter. The image was inspired by the quote, "Be the type of person that not only turns heads, but turns souls."

Google Doodle

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In winning this competition, Johnson was able to do just that, showing children everywhere that there is certainly a payoff for not giving into the pressures of being something that you're not -- and, instead, embodying all that you are, from your roots on up.

 

Image via Akilah Johnson / Google

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