sliver pitchersWhile dining out isn't exactly an extreme sport, it also isn't without risk. The question raised by a recent lawsuit against celebrity chef Wolfgang Puck, however, is: How responsible are restaurants when things go wrong?

According to TMZ, a woman named Tamara Mason-Williams has filed a lawsuit against Puck saying that when she was eating at his establishment, The Source Restaurant, last April, a waitress hit her in the head with a "heavy metal water pitcher."

Ouch and unfortunate, yes, but she claims that it left her with a concussion. She's now suing for unspecified damages for lost income and medical expenses and accuses Puck of having "negligently trained" staff.

You mean they didn't have classes on how not to whack customers in the head with water pitchers? How dare they!

I don't mean to be flip about her alleged injury, but come on. Wouldn't an apology and maybe a free meal be enough? Even if the waitress did hit her hard enough to result in an injury, accidents happen. Suing every time one does isn't fair to anyone.

But sue they do. From the guy who sued because he couldn't fit into a restaurant booth to the customer who sued because the coffee was too hot, we've seen plenty of cases over the years. But if people don't stop, restaurants are going to have to start asking people to sign waivers before dining.

Food by its very nature can be a risky business -- no matter where you eat it. From e.coli contamination to kitchen accidents, sometimes people get hurt while cooking and eating food. Restaurants should do everything they can to prevent that from happening, but the fact is that even if they do everything according to "the book," accidents and incidents are still going to happen. Diners who sue every time they do are just going to make us all pay in the end.

What do you think of this lawsuit?

 

Image via Steve Snodgrass/Flickr