Women Should Eat Like It's Sex -- Thanks, Meg Ryan!

Kelli Best-Oliver
3

cheese plate

When I think about food, it's generally in a positive, I'm-a-foodie-and-slightly-obsessed way. But it's not that way for most women. Lots of ladies use food as a way to make themselves feel horrible about themselves. They see food as something they are not supposed to have, something that makes them look and feel terrible. How unappetizing!

If only we thought about food the same way that men think about sex. Who can forget Meg Ryan's orgasmic experience in the deli in When Harry Met Sally and the iconic line that followed, "I'll have what she's having." Consider this: 36 percent of men think about sex every 30 minutes, 25 percent of women think about food every 30 minutes, reports the Daily Mail.

While women have a Cathy-esque laugh about our stereotypical preoccupation with eating and men's with doin' it, a recent study had some more concerning findings about how women view food.

The study found that 40 percent of women consider themselves to be constantly dieting or concerned about their weight, and 60 percent of women do not feel comfortable eating in front of their partner.

When did food stop being a way to nourish our bodies and one of life's greatest pleasures and start being just another way women feel shame about themselves? We've got to examine studies like these so we can work on changing our negative relationships with food. It often feels like women think about food so much because they believe they aren't supposed to have it. Nonsense. I firmly believe that any food is fine in moderation. It's when we live sedentary lives coupled with constant overeating of high-calorie, low-nutrient processed foods that we get into unhealthy territory. That, and when we constantly compare ourselves to the size 0 women we see everywhere in the media.

Instead of the typical "weight loss" resolution that so many of us adopt for New Year's, only to abandon once real life gets in the way, I hope we all focus on creating a healthier relationship with food, one that allows us to positively think about food often.

 

Image via dailyfood/Flickr

Read More