7 Smelliest Foods From Around the World

Brittny Drye


Durians -- Spiky and smelly!

Bombs schmombs. Who needs explosives when you have stinky food? The President of Iran, who was in New York last week for a UN General Assembly, practically cleared out the entire Hilton hotel because of the horrible smell that came from his food made by his personal chef.

Perhaps a trial run with their newest war weaponry?

While it hasn't been released exactly which kind of food was the cause for the evacuation, we can make some guesses.

Durians: Also known as the "king of fruit," durians are extremely popular in southeast Asia. The smell has been described as overripe cheese, rotting fish, unwashed socks, and a city dump on a hot summer's day. Ironically, durians have also been said to be an aphrodisiac. Just be sure to rinse your mouth thoroughly before getting it on.

Vieux Boulogne Cheese: It took a team of scientists to dub this as the world's stinkiest cheese, though I'm sure the French townspeople of Boulogne, where the cheese is made, already knew that.

Curry: We all love it. But we also hate that guy that brings it back to the office for lunch, and unfortunately for those of us here at The Stir, we work in an area of town that's known as "Curry Hill" because of all the Indian restaurants in the area.


Kiviak: Imagine the smell of something that's been buried in the ground for up to six months. Then imagine eating it. That's exactly what Kiviak is. It used to be a traditional Christmas food in Greenland that is a seabird stuffed inside of a seal, then buried until liquefaction. Its popularity has decreased in modern times, though I can't imagine why.

Shrimp Paste: A common ingredient in southern Chinese cuisine, it's made from fermented ground shrimp that has been sun-dried and then cut into fist-sized rectangular blocks.

shrimp paste

Surströmming: This northern Scandinavian delicacy comes in a can, and upon opening it, the smell hits you like a ton of bricks. But it's all part of the experience right? It's made from herring that has been brined for months and is spread over bread and often topped with onions, you know, just to make it smellier. 

Kimchi: A traditional Korean side dish that's made of fermented vegetables (oftentimes cabbage) topped with various seasonings. The smell is so strong that many Koreans have a special kimchi fridge that they keep in the garage or basement.

Have you ever tried any of these foods? Would a horrid smell deter you from trying them?

Image via YimHafiz/Flickr, _pdra's portfolio/Flickr, clayirving/Flickr

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