Every super successful woman will tell you that her achievements didn't come without tremendous sacrifice. Long hours, extensive travel, plowing away even during your "off-hours." But was it worth it? Is that more important than love? That is the question Nicole Kidman found herself asking after her 2003 Oscar win for The Hours. She had reached the pinnacle in the acting world but it meant nothing without one thing.

Love. Plain and simple. Love. Kidman couldn't celebrate that momentous achievement because she was alone. Her 11-year marriage to Tom Cruise had ended very publicly and she was heartbroken and alone. That Oscar just served to drive home that fact. The award "can show you the emptiness of your own life, which is kind of what it showed me," she said in the new issue of Harper's Bazaar Australia. "I was having professional success and my personal life was struggling."

She's certainly not alone in feeling that way. A lot of driven women face that very same dilemma. Sometimes, it's because they have been too busy working to even take time to date or find Mr. Right. For others, their significant others rank well below their job responsibilities. I'm not saying that is absolutely wrong. I have certainly been guilty of that at times in my life. But there is a price for that.

Perhaps that price is having kids late. Or never getting married. Or neglecting your relationship. That's not to say driven women should quit working and try to morph into a modern day June Cleaver. But what is needed is some kind of balance. Because at the end of the day, if your job disappeared, what would sustain you? Who would be there for you? You should have all the success you've dreamed of, but if you have no one to celebrate with, it's just not as sweet.

What is more important in your life -- success, relationships, or family? How do you balance it all?

 

Image via Harper's Bazaar