New DNA Test on Bones in Natalee Holloway Case Gives Us Hope for Closure

Natalee Holloway
Today.com

After Natalee Holloway's dad, Dave Holloway, recently announced that he and a private investigator discovered a new development in his missing daughter's case, the seemingly good news was met with controversy. Dave alleged that he and T.J. Ward found human remains that could possibly belong to the high school student who vanished in Aruba, but critics slammed the potential break as a possible publicity stunt for the new Oxygen show The Disappearance of Natalee Holloway. Now, DNA testing may prove the critics wrong.

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Natalee's parents haven't given up searching for their daughter since she disappeared 12 years ago during an international trip shortly after her high school graduation, and results from the newly discovered bone fragments could mean that they are closer than ever to finally having answers. After pieces of human remains were found in Aruba, Dave and T.J. sent them to Dr. Jason Kolowski, who arranged the lengthy DNA testing that's yielded some surprising results.

Natalee Holloway
Today.com

"They are human, and they are of Caucasian, European descent," the forensic scientist told Oxygen.com. He also explained that at least one of the bone fragments is "from a single individual."

Natalee was also Caucasian and of European descent. It's important to note, though, that the DNA testing still isn't complete, as Kolowski explained that it's mitochondrial and not nuclear -- so it will take some time for final results. However, he hopes to have official answers in the coming weeks.

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The testing won't be able to confirm the gender of the remains, but Kolowski said that it can still determine whether the bone fragments belong to Natalee, who was declared legally dead in 2012 without any DNA evidence. Mitochondrial DNA, which is what is being examined, is determined solely by a mother, so scientists are testing the bone samples against a mitochondrial sample from Natalee's mom, Beth. "Beth's would be exactly the same as Natalee's or any of Beth's other children," Kolowski said.

Although the public is anxiously awaiting these results, nobody deserves answers about what happened to the teen more than Beth and Dave.

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