Man Accused of Pretending to be Navy Seal & Duping Kind Locals

Let's face it, if you are a Navy Seal, people are going to pay attention. They're going to sit up straight, look you in the eye, probably thank you for your service, and buy you a drink if you're drinking! And unfortunately some people take advantage of that and use the ol' "I'm a veteran" or "I'm in the service" line to get special favors. Even if they are NOT in the military. That's allegedly what Schoen Labombard pulled in Daytona Beach, Florida when he began telling anyone who would listen that he was a Navy Seal who needed help.

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Labombard began telling people inside Neptune's Sports Pub that he was a Seal who had just been robbed, and that he was desperately trying to get a little rest and money before he headed back to base camp. From there, he said he was on his way to Afghanistan.

The good-hearted locals set him up with an ocean-view room at a nearby hotel. Jim Brittain, who owns the bar, told him not to worry about paying for food. And then the kind-hearted man gave him $500 since "Seppi" was claiming his wallet was stolen.

Brittain and the pub locals even got a call one night from someone claiming to be Seppi's commanding officer, thanking everyone for helping this unlucky Seal out.

But the story all came crashing down when one night Seppi was out on the town with his new pals and climbed over a fence and fell, breaking his leg. The new friends rushed him to the hospital.

They then went back to the hotel room to make sure it was locked and secure and that he had his things. That's when they found his license -- under the name of Schoen Labombard.

A bar waitress who was furious at being conned went to the hospital to see Labombard without telling him she knew he was a fraud. She kept her cool even though it was "very hard" and snapped a picture of him.

Eventually it came out that Labombard was a conman who was already wanted in New York for impersonating a police officer. He also had a long criminal history of fraud.

Sociopaths are often known to impersonate figures of authority -- cops, soldiers, CIA members and the like. They are aware that people generally throw their trust quickly behind a person with an authoritative job.

More from The Stir: Man Steals Fallen Soldier's Identity in Despicable Attempt to Get a Date (VIDEO)

Brittain says being taken advantage of won't sour him on helping people, but that he's glad Labombard was arrested and may spend some time in prison.

This is a guy who managed to make friends easily, he probably didn't have to lie about being a soldier. How sad and lame.

Have you ever met anyone who lied about being military?

 

Image via WESH

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