Abigail Breslin Opens Up About Why She Didn't Report Her Rape

Abigail Breslin Women Making History Brunch 2016
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Two weeks ago, in light of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, Abigail Breslin opened up about her sexual assault. The 21-year-old Scream Queens star shared a photo on Instagram with a block of text reading, "Consent II: You are not obligated to have sex with someone that you're in a relationship with. Dating is not consent. Marriage is not consent." Now, she's further explaining the nightmare she endured and why she didn't come forward immediately after the rape.

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"I did not report my rape," she wrote in the Instagram post. "I didn't report it because of many reasons. First off, I was in complete shock and total denial. I didn't want to view myself as a victim so I suppressed it and pretended it never happened."

abigail breslin rape report explanation instagram
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"I was in a relationship with my rapist and feared not being believed," Breslin continued. "I also feared that if my case didn't lead anywhere, he would still find out and hurt me even more. Thirdly, I knew how hurt my family and friends would be after finding out and I didn't want to put them thru that."

More from CafeMom: Meet the Powerful Hashtag Women Are Using to Fight Sexual Assault -- & Trump

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After enduring this personal nightmare, Breslin was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. "I still jump when somebody touches me unexpectedly, even if it's my best friend tapping me on the shoulder," she explained, going on to note that saying "unreported rapes don't matter" is "unfair, untrue and unhelpful. It's like [saying] you got a black eye from being punched in the face, but because you didn't call the police, you didn't really get a black eye. Unreported rapes count. Reported rapes count. End of the story."

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100 percent yes.

More power to Breslin for being so outspoken about this deeply personal but also extremely important message. It couldn't have been easy to share her story and defend how she went about dealing with the trauma. But by explaining the aftermath of her assault, she's speaking for so many women who have endured the very same abuse from someone they knew, or perhaps were in a relationship with.

Hopefully Breslin's brave message will encourage and empower those women to speak up and break their silence. 

 

If you or someone you know has been the victim of a sexual assault, you can find help and support at RAINN.org, the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 1 800 656 HOPE (4673), or Safe Horizon Crime Victims Hotline 1 866 689 HELP (4357).

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