What Tabloid Headlines Would Look Like Without Sexism: Would You Still Click? (PHOTOS)

We suck in media at such a breakneck pace these days that it's rare to stop and consider what it actually is that we're reading and watching. But if we did, what we'd see isn't that great from a feminist perspective: Tabloids, in particular, are famously unfair to women ... and if anything, that just makes them more successful.

Advertisement

In an ideal world, we'd be reading articles about women's careers instead of their clothes, and about their businesses -- not their bodies. It'd be about how women are people instead of just nice things to look at and critique sometimes.

Though the tabloid business isn't going to change tomorrow, two students from Elon University decided to visualize a feminist future for tabloids and share their versions of what headlines would look like without the sexism. And, let us tell you, it is a be-a-u-tiful future.

The sexism-free images came out of the capstone project of Erin Valentine and Ashley McGetrick, both of whom have a passion for feminism and media literacy.

"Our goal is to make people more aware and critical of what they are reading," Valentine said. "By translating these headlines to be more feminist-friendly, we hope to call out sexist and unequal cultural expectations and practices."

More from The StirThink You're Not a Feminist? This Will Prove You Wrong (VIDEO)

The results are a little jarring -- it's easy to forget that many of the discussions we have about women aren't the ones we should be having. And a lot of the discrepancies in the headlines are so commonplace that we just breeze past them.

And in most cases, the change is easy. For example, one tabloid published this headline after Blake Lively's busy press tour: "Blake Lively wore HOW many outfits in 48 hours?!"

But as Valentine and McGetrick pointed out in their project, a feminist-friendly headline would be an easy swap to make: "Blake Lively went to HOW many events in 48 hours?!"

In the second, we're focusing on her accomplishments instead of her clothes. But even though it's simple in theory, seeing actual change across the board will take time.

"I think that if readers continue to push and demand stories that are about people's accomplishments and not just their physical looks that eventually the industry could begin to change and shift," Valentine said. "But it takes everyone to recognize the problem and do what they can to make a difference."

Take a look at the revised tabloids and tell us:

Do you think a feminist future is a reasonable goal for the tabloid industry?

 

Image via Erin Valentine and Ashley McGetrick