10-Year-Old's Powerful Poem About Life With Dyslexia Is a Must-Read

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A young girl sits in class and writes intently in her notebook.
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It's pretty rare that you read a poem written by a 10-year-old and find yourself feeling moved and even empowered by the time you reach its end. But that's exactly what happened when Jane Broadis was reading through her sixth-graders' assignments recently, and came across a poem called "Dyslexia" that stopped her in her tracks. 

  • The poem, which is now going viral on Twitter, is just eight lines long -- and upon first read, seems relatively unremarkable.

    It reads:

    I am stupid.

    Nobody would ever say

    I have a talent for words

    I was meant to be great.

    That is wrong

    I am a failure.

    Nobody could ever convince me to think that

    I can make it in life.

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  • To be honest, it strikes a dark and even depressing tone. That is, until you read the directions at the bottom, which instruct you to "Now read up!"

    When read in reverse, the eight-line poem suddenly transforms in meaning. What once read like a message of defeat is suddenly an empowering mantra for anyone who has ever struggled with the challenges of dyslexia:

    I can make it in life.

    Nobody could ever convince me to think that

    I am a failure.

    That is wrong

    I was meant to be great.

    I have a talent for words

    Nobody would ever say

    I am stupid.

  • It wasn't long before the Internet gave the student a serious slow clap and praised the poem for its inspiring message.

    Those who were especially touched were the Twitter users who say they've lived with dyslexia themselves and struggled to cope for years.

    "Wonderful!" wrote one user. "I was called stupid by my year 6 teacher. Three years later diagnosed with dyslexia. We just see things others can not."

    "I am dyslexic," added another. "I learn differently, I find some of the things my brain comes up with hilarious. This young students poem is wonderful. Well done. Dyslexia doesn’t stop you doing anything. You just have to find a way around the obstacle. Side step it."

  • After being posted to Twitter on February 27, it's since received more than 53,000 retweets and more than 175,000 likes. 

    In her caption, Broadis revealed that the poem was inspired after a class lesson on poems that can be read backward and forward, but she wasn't expecting such a deeply moving practice poem -- especially straight out of the mind of a 10-year-old.

    "Please share," Broadis wrote. "I would love her work to be appreciated further afield. I wonder if it could even find a publisher?"

  • Considering dyslexia affects so many Americans -- especially children -- each year, it's no wonder the poem resonated so deeply.

    According to the University of Michigan, dyslexia is actually one of the most common language-based learning disabilities. In fact, 70 to 80 percent of those with reading, writing, or spelling difficulties are likely dyslexic. And yet a hefty amount of shame and denial still are associated with it -- something the poet undoubtedly wishes to help shatter.

    Serious snaps to the unnamed writer -- here's hoping she gets that poem published one day soon!