'We're Both on the Same Side': 15 Things Teachers Wish Parents Knew

Tanvier Peart | Sep 9, 2016 Big Kid

A school teacher's desk with stack of exercise books and apple in left frame. A blackboard in soft focus

Class might be in session for many children, but there are a few notes that aren't going to make a school's monthly newsletter. Between lesson planning and grading homework, teachers are trying to figure out the best way to tackle the academic year and take care of our kids -- and one thing that would really help is making sure everyone is on the same page. And by everyone ... that means us!

No matter how annoyed we are at carpool lines, endless assignments, and buying all those damn school supplies, it's important to remember how real the struggle is for teachers, too. 

Have you ever wondered the thoughts, fears, and frustrations that run through a teacher's mind? Check out these nuggets of info teachers wish all parents knew. 

After all -- knowledge is power. And when it comes to our kids' educations, we're all in this together!

teachers wish parents knew
 

 

Image via weRpix/Shutterstock

  • We Have to Shell Out Money on School Supplies, Too

    1

    "It always tickles me (I'm trying to keep things G-rated) when I hear parents crying and complaining about the school supplies they have to buy. Do they forget that teachers also have their own kids, who also need endless amounts of glue sticks and number two pencils? Guess what? We're not here to rob you." -- Rachel T.

    More from CafeMom: 14 Kids Share the Heartbreaking Things They Wish Their Teachers Knew

  • Your Home Is the Key to Success

    2

    "I can almost guarantee a successful school year if parents are willing to get more involved in their child's academic endeavors. I'll make sure your son or daughter learns in the classroom, but could really use the reinforcement at home." -- Cassidy D.

    More from CafeMom: 10 Apps & Games That Trick Tech-Loving Kids Into Learning

  • We're Not Here for the Money

    3

    "I've been an educator for five years now and barely make $40,000 a year. There are constant budget and job cuts that make me fearful I won't be able to provide for my family one day. I wish parents knew how hard this job can be financially speaking. It's not uncommon for a teacher to work a second job." -- Gabriella A.

  • Deal With Us Directly

    4

    "As funny as Kevin Hart's joke about his teacher was, please don't use your kid as a postal service to deliver messages with NSFW phrases. Yes, there will be times when we will send a note or two home, but just as we pick up the phone to speak to you directly, please do the same -- and please don't go from zero to 60 by wanting to speak to the principal first. Remember, telling your child to tell his or her teacher a message will likely get lost in translation." -- Aimee S.

    More from CafeMom: 20 Things Never to Say to Your Kid's Teacher

  • Don't Be So Hard on Your Little One

    5

    "There have been times I had to fight back tears after seeing a parent go off on their child. No matter how frustrating kids can be, please remember that words hurt. How you speak to your little ones can shape who they think they are." -- Phyllis A.

  • Stop Sending Your Sick Kids to School!

    6

    "I love your rugrat, I truly do ... but, please STOP sending your child all snotty and coughy to my classroom. We have enough germs to deal with!" -- Sandy E.

  • Take Off the (Boxing) Gloves at Parent-Teacher Conferences

    7

    "I really wish parents would stop coming to parent-teacher conferences so defensive. I'm not trying to pick on your child, or make you feel like a total loser. The animosity is so counterproductive." -- Samantha B.

    More from CafeMom: 7 Questions to Ask at Your Parent/Teacher Conference

  • Please, No More Coffee Mugs

    8

    "As much as I love -- and need -- my morning shot of caffeine, I really don't have room in my cupboard for any more mugs. I hate people who tell others what to get them ... so just know, when in doubt, a little Starbucks gift card will go a long way." -- Cherline O.

  • Show Up If You Can

    9

    "All of us have hectic schedules and work demands, but if you can show up to one or two of your child's assemblies or school activities, I guarantee you'll make your son or daughter's day." -- Paris G.

  • Please Stop Doing Your Kid's Homework -- We Can Tell

    10

    "If you're going to 'help' your child with homework assignments, please remember your son or daughter has yet to attend college. Teachers can tell when parents do their kid's homework. If you have the time to dedicate, that's on you. Just know said child isn't learning that way." -- Yasmine T.

    More from CafeMom: 14 Hiarious Excuses Kids Give to Avoid Homework

  • You Don't Have to Be Martha Stewart

    11

    "No one expects you to be Martha Stewart (feel free to send cookies my way!) by challenging other parents to a bake-off at school. Just know that getting involved -- including checking homework folders, keeping an eye out for assignments, and attending conferences -- really help teachers help your kid." -- Amelie L.

  • Affection Goes a Long Way

    12

    "Can we talk? I see parents pull up to school and push their kids out of the car, without so much as a 'Have a nice day' or pat on the back. Getting to work is important, but we can all take a few seconds out of our days to show our children some affection. They crave it, and will likely act out if they don't get it at home." -- Charisse J.

  • Go Easy on Your Teens

    13

    "I think it's easy for parents to forget that they were once young, dumb, and in love, too. Your teens (preteens, even) are going to get on your nerves, lie, and make mistakes. But, guess what? So do you -- and you're still alive. Try not to crucify your teenagers too much for being teenagers." -- Carla V.

    More from CafeMom: 18 Rules for Teenagers From America's 'Strictest' Parents

  • Remember We Work, Too

    14

    "As much as I love being spontaneous, impromptu visits to see me during the workday just aren't going to fly. Teachers typically schedule calls and in-person meetings because we're trying to stretch what moments to ourselves we have between classes to stay ahead of the game. Also, if I don't immediately respond to your email or voicemail, that doesn't mean I hate you or your child." -- Frances M.

  • We're Both on the Same Side

    15

    "Why is it so hard for some parents to believe that teachers don't have it out for their kids? We're both on the same side! Some moms and dads have called me a liar to my face, because they refuse to believe their children could ever do anything wrong. What does that teach kids?" -- Leah B.

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