jenny mccarthy sonAbout half of all children will experience bullying in their lives and at least 10 percent of them experience it on a regular basis. Oftentimes, parents don't think it can happen to or around their children, but chances are most kids will encounter it at one point. Most recently, celeb mom Jenny McCarthy has voiced her thoughts on the issue when she revealed that her son Evan, who has autism, has been bullied in camp without even realizing it.

On Monday's edition of The View, Jenny came clean about the troubles. Apparently, she received an email from the camp that said that Evan's "friends" might actually be bullying him.

In the heartbreaking confession, she went on to say that Evan's "main goal is to make as many friends as possible" and that "they're laughing at him but he laughs too."

And that's where her struggle truly is: how to tell Evan that the comments and actions of his "friends" are actually forms of bullying? Or should she even tell him?

More from The Stir: Your Kid Is a Bully -- Now What?

Sadly, this is not a celebrity-only issue. Regular moms are in McCarthy's boat quite often. So what can we do?

While it's undoubtedly difficult to see your child being hurt, it's also important to make them aware of how hurtful the remarks can actually be. And it's usually not too difficult to notice when these comments end up taking a toll on your kid. Your child might give up signs that he or she is being bullied, whether it's through their sudden changes in friends, tastes, fashion choices, grades, or eating habits, and that's when it's time for parents to step in and start a conversation.

Calmly, bring up the topics casually and never interrogate. Ask them to explain what is happening at school, camp, a friend's house, and continue with open-ended questions to get the full story. Only then can you form your own opinion and start communicating with teachers, counselors, and other parents.

How do you talk to your children about bullying?

 

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