Fat barbie app

I can't even imagine the bozo who thought  that an application slicing and dicing an "unfortunate looking" Barbie was a good idea. Apparently Apple's App Store pulled a Barbie-inspired plastic surgery app, called Plastic Surgery & Plastic Doctor & Plastic Hospital Office for Barbie Version, earlier this week after some intense backlash from Twitter. The game walked users through the extremely graphic steps of liposuction that would be performed on a chubby version of Barbie to make her look "slim and beautiful."

Seriously.

How did that all work out, you wonder? Well players could inject anesthetic, make an incision with a scalpel, and then actually suction out fat with a pump on all of Barbie's "problem areas."

And people wonder why young girls have a problem with their body image?

The fact that this app, which was approved for ages 9 years and up, would be played for "fun" makes me sick. I mean, what parent would be OK with their child playing a game where it's standard to slice a chunk out of someone's stomach to make them "beautiful," so to speak? What kind of parent would think this was a NORMAL way to spend part of a Saturday afternoon?

The answer: Not any that I know. When it comes down to it, it's a parents job to show their children that beauty doesn't just mean being thin. Beauty is about what's on the inside. Beauty is about how a person feels, and the attitude they project.

Although it may be hard filtering out some of the poor body image messaging in the media for children, it's important to reinforce the right kind of ideals in the home. It's important for them to know that there isn't one definition of beautiful.

Thankfully, the app has been pulled since the controversy.

Is this absolutely despicable or what? What else do you think contributes to young girls' insecurities?

 

Image via iTunes