Why I'd Let My Daughter Get a Nose Job

Heather Murphy-Raines

Heather Murphy-Raines/Scout's Honor
There is just something about having a daughter. Something special. Don't get me wrong, my boys are also special in their own ways, but a baby girl?

If you're like me, she will have you dreaming about poufy wedding dresses just seconds after you meet her in the labor & delivery room.

Now imagine your baby girl grows up. Gets engaged. And oh right, she decides she so doesn't want to look like your baby girl or have your family features that she is willing to ...

One Year Old

Oh. No. Oh. No. Oh no no no no ... Oh, Yes! 

Yes, she is willing to go on national television to reject that very resemblance, that lack of cleavage, the family nose -- pretty much all that you find endearing -- in a crazy Bridezilla plastic surgery competition like that on Bridalplasty, a new reality show on which brides-to-be compete to carve that beautiful mole or lob straight off the floppy ears that their moms found so endearing. 


Back to my daughter. One ritual of mine from the first day she was born? 

Tracing her features to see where she resembles me. I know all moms think their daughters are gorgeous, but mine is a beauty. I know it's true, since strangers have approached us and said so ever since she was a baby.

One such lady's charming words are imprinted on my brain forevermore ...

"She's beautiful ... she doesn't look a thing like you."

Well, sheeeet.

How does one respond? Umm ... thanks?

I can't quibble too much though. There was a truth we all knew. My daughter does take after her Daddy. Her eyes, her hair, and her nose. 

Yes, THE family nose. 

That nose.

My mother-in-law once told me she prayed and prayed that her children wouldn't get her husband's prominent nose. My husband was generally spared with more of an acceptable amalgam of the two. My sister-in-law, my MIL sighed, was "not so lucky." Ouch!

So as my daughter grows, something superficial in me, someone of whom I am not so proud, looks for THE nose. It comes and goes as she grows. In my eyes, she is perfect. 


I love looking at her, and seeing my husband. 

However, if suddenly as an adult, I looked at her and saw my father-in-law's wide nose and my daughter wasn't happy? Would I begrudge her some plastic surgery?

Maybe on national television, but for self-esteem, I might not begrudge her if she did it in private.

More of a worry? Double-D's and Eastern European hairy legs (they both run on my husband's side of the family). I admit, I lamented to my sisters the other day on Facebook, "What if my lithe, competitive swimming daughter inherits those? Can you imagine the drag on those puppies?"

OH. THE. Horrors.

Yes, it's official. I am turning into the grandma on Sixteen Candles checking out her tween's bewbies.

So what about you? 

Would you support your daughter, on national TV or not, changing some feature of herself that she hates? 

It is her body, after all.


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