nightingaleHere's what I really want to know about the super-pricey bird poo facials Tom Cruise reportedly relies on to maintain those boyish good looks: Who was the first person to notice that, Hey, whenever I smear nightingale droppings on my skin, it positively glows! (This reminds me of the whole mold/penicillin thing. Except for the life-saving potential part.)

No, I'm not making this up, and no, Tom Cruise isn't the only celeb who pays a pretty penny to have somebody rub nightingale doody all over his face. Other famous fans reportedly include Jessica Simpson and Victoria Beckham, which must mean that bird poop is now ... posh? In fact, the practice dates all the way back to ancient Japan, where Geishas swore by the treatment's benefits. Okay, those are some decent testimonials. Still, the question is, do nightingale poo facials really make your skin look better?

Apparently the treatment really does work -- or it really can. According to Hayes Gladstone M.D., director of dermatologic surgery at Stanford University, “Bird droppings have uric acid and are nitrogen based, and if rubbed on the skin can exfoliate and could be beneficial, but only in a superficial manner. But pigeon droppings from out in the park may be just as effective.”

Blech, no thanks! Pigeons are gross. At least nightingales are songbirds, not rats with wings (as most city dwellers consider pigeons to be). And I guess a nightingale facial is a lot less risky than Botox or plastic surgery, which Cruise supposedly won't try.

Bottom line: If someone was willing to pay a couple hundred bucks for me to try a bird poo facial, I probably would. But I wouldn't pay for one myself.

Would you get a bird poo facial like Tom Cruise?


Image via Petra and Wilifried/Flickr