DIY Romper Sleepwear

Brianne DiSylvester
1

diy romper
Photo by Brightest Young Things
With all this talk of rompers yesterday, I thought about making my own.

It's a little tricky and you need a sewing machine, so I'll leave this up to the intermediate folks.

This is perfect for bedtime, doing chores about the house, gardening, or playing in the backyard with your tots. If you make the shorts a little longer, you can even wear it out of the house.

You can even make a romper for your baby out of an old t-shirt.

But first, get the step-by-step directions for the grown-up version:

DIY Romper from Brightest Young Things

  • 2 t-shirts (one that’ll fit you on top, and one in a bigger size that you can cut apart to make the shorts)
  • Chalk or pencil to trace on the fabric
  • Straight pins
  • 1 spool of thread
  • 1 needle
  • Scissors
  • Sewing machine (optional – the romper featured here was sewn by hand because my machine decided to die on me. It’ll take an extra couple hours if you do it without a machine)

Follow along with pictures.

1. To make the top, take the smaller t-shirt and cut it straight across from underarm to underarm.

2. Fold the top down a couple times so that the ragged edge is on the inside of the shirt and iron it flat. Use a few stitches to keep it in place. (Experienced sewers could also do a full-on hem).

3. You’ll want to add either straps, a halter, or sew elastic into the top so that the romper will stay put. Be creative – use ribbon, t-shirt scraps, or other materials to embellish.

4. For the shorts, begin by tracing this pattern onto the fabric using chalk or pencil. The pattern may need to be scaled larger or smaller depending on your size. To determine how big to make it, the top of each piece (that will ultimately comprise the waist of the shorts) should be about ¼ your waist measurement.

5. Once traced, use sharp scissors to cut the fabric along the traced lines. It’s always best to cut a ways outside the lines so the shorts fit properly.

6. Now you’ll want to start pinning your fabric with straight pins. Begin by placing “front A” on top of “front B” so that their parts correspond. Then pin the two pieces of fabric together along the lines indicated in red. Do the same for “back A” and “back B,” as indicated in blue.

7. Remember that you’re sewing your romper “inside out,” so you’ll ultimately flip the garment outside-in and wear it with all the stitching and rough edges hidden.Using your machine or your needle and thread, sew “front A” and “front B” together along the pinned line and then do the same for “back A” and “back B.” Try to sew close to the edge of the fabric

8. Pin the side of “front A” to the corresponding side of “back B,” as indicated here in purple, and do the same for “front B” and “back A,” as indicated in green.

9. Using your machine or your needle and thread, sew “front A” and “front B” together. Then do the same for “front B” and “back A.” Now it’s starting to look like shorts!

10. To sew the last part (the crotch) together, match the edge of the tabs from the front of the shorts to the ones in the back of the shorts and sew them together using a straight or U-shaped line.

11. Fold the top of the shorts down once so that the ragged edge is on the inside of the garment and iron it flat. Use a few stitches to keep it in place. Do the same for the parts around the legs. You could also roll the shorts up if you want a cuff.

12. Keeping the shorts and top inside out, stitch the two pieces together. Once finished, turn the romper outside-in. This is the (almost) finished product.

13. Get creative and add any last-minute embellishments (buttons, bows, paint, perhaps some sweet airbrushed artwork…).

14. Wear!

Would you try this?

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