Breastfeeding Censorship Sinks to New Level of Ridiculous on News Show

breastfeeding censorshipWhen reporting on a story about breastfeeding issues, you'd expect to hear some mention of nipples, correct? Well apparently BBC found the word 'nipples' a tad too "graphic" and inappropriate and entirely edited it out.

The new segment, which was covered by BBC Breakfast, focused on the problem of tongue-tie, which is a condition that affects about 3 percent of babies. However, when a guest expert on the segment said that the condition causes nipples to becomes irritated and bleed (a fairly important point, no?), the program asked them to restate their comment. Only this time, without saying 'nipples.'

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Alright, let's give this a go, BBC-style:

Tongue-tie is the condition in which the length of skin under the baby's tongue is too short. When the infant goes to latch onto the female body part on its mother's upper chest and attempts to nurse from the tiny obtrusion that rests atop these milk-filled pillows, he encounters problems. Because the child often has to chew or nibble at the point, the apex on the circular plane becomes irritated and may even begin to bleed.

And while we're at it, why not BBC-ify some other common breastfeeding terms:

Thrush: a yeast infection that is spread between the baby's mouth as it feeds through the milk-dispenser on the mother's torso.

Inverted nipple: a condition in which the tip of the mother's mammary gland assumes a concave position and retreats back into the bosom.

Flange burn: an upset that occurs when the spout used to excrete protein-rich fluid from a woman's udder is either too tight or is not properly removed.

Plugged duct: an area of a woman's rounded mounds, located on the superior of her chest, where the flow of milk is either entirely obstructed or partly blocked.

So, let's be honest here. Which version sounds worse?

I'd rather go with 'nipples,' thankyouverymuch.

What do you think of the editing? Should have they kept the word in, or is it too inappropriate?

 

Image via ybrad/Flickr

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