Kate MiddletonSince word got out that Kate Middleton is expecting a royal bundle sometime this year, there's been a lot of speculation over what Princess Diana would have thought of son Prince William's new baby. Word has it she would have been thrilled to be a grandmother. But what about the baby?

What is it going to be like for the newborn prince or princess to be the grandchild of an icon who died too soon? Sad? Maybe. Then again, maybe not as much as you'd think.

When little Katie or Willy asks, "So what was Granny like?" Kate and William won't have to stumble over an answer as many parents do when reminded of a late loved one. They can take the tot right over to a computer and show the child exactly who Grandma was. In fact, they can show the child that Grandma was beloved by hundreds of thousands, maybe even millions of people. 

Not a bad legacy, really.

I'm not saying it will be easy. My daughter met my grandmother before she passed away, but 2013 marks five years since her death, and my daughter's memories are few and fleeting. Every once in awhile she'll say something that makes it so painfully obvious that she doesn't remember her that it nearly brings me to tears. The best I can do is to show her pictures, to tell her stories.

And yet, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have an advantage that most families don't. They don't have to make do with a few family snapshots. There are hundreds of thousands of photos and videos of Princess Diana out there. There are articles. Documentaries.

This is a child who won't get a grandmother's hugs and kisses (at least not from Diana, although Kate's mom is said to be very much involved), but at least the royal baby will get to know who this wonderful woman was. They'll know that they're the descendant of someone who changed the world.

Did you lose someone close before your baby came into the world? How do you keep their memory alive for your child?

 

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