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10 Best & Worst Places to Be Born in 2013

by Jeanne Sager on November 30, 2012 at 9:16 AM

baby handHad a baby lately? I've got good news and bad news for you. The United States isn't the worst place in the world for a baby to be born. Then again, it's not the best either.

In fact, being born in the old U.S. of A. isn't a whole lot better than coming into the world in certain Middle Eastern countries! At least, that's the word from the Economist Intelligence Unit, a sister company of the magazine The Economist, that decided to look at everything from geography to the political climate of countries around the world to determine whether kids have a chance at health, safety, and prosperity in their birth countries. 

Any guesses whose babies have got it made in the shade?

The Swiss! The home of the cheese, fancy watches, fabulous chocolate, and neutrality is the best place in the entire world to be a baby in the coming year. Hmm ... thinking of my baby growing up to be a banker ...

The United States, on the other hand, falls at 16 and we're tied with Germany for that spot. It's not awful ... we're nothing like Nigeria, which comes in the very worst at 80. But still, for a country I'm pretty darn proud of, it's a little depressing. We bring kids into the world with such hopes and dreams for them. At the very least, we want to provide them with the best start in life.

Wonder where things are better? Or worse? Here's a look at the top 10 on either end of the spectrum:

Best Places for a Baby (in descending order from the very, very best):

  1. Switzerland
  2. Australia
  3. Norway
  4. Sweden
  5. Denmark
  6. Singapore
  7. New Zealand
  8. Netherlands
  9. Canada
  10. Hong Kong

And now for the worst (in ascending order from the very, very worst):

  1. Nigeria
  2. Kenya
  3. Ukraine
  4. Bangladesh
  5. Angola
  6. Pakistan
  7. Kazakhstan
  8. Syria
  9. Russia
  10. Indonesia

Where are you and your baby living? Are you surprised the US isn't on the top 10 list?

 

Image via MrGreen09/Flickr

Filed Under: baby first year

Comments

20
  • tuffy...
    --

    tuffymama

    November 30, 2012 at 9:40 AM
    Nothing on this list surprises me, but I figured we might be around number twenty or so. We're slightly better than I expected.

    I do wonder how long it is before someone accuses The Economist of racism because of this list.
  • Andre...
    -- Facebook comment from

    Andrea Musser Young

    November 30, 2012 at 10:38 AM

    It doesn't surprise me at all, other than being better than what my opinion is.  No question I love being an American BUT this country in general is on a downhill slope.  Just imagine when these babies are grown...


  • Virid...
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    ViridianSoul

    November 30, 2012 at 10:47 AM

    Agreed 100% with tuffymama AND Andrea above. I was not surprised one bit. In fact, I thought we would probably be lower. After all, most western nations give new mothers at least six months, if not longer, to stay home and bond with their baby before they have to go back to work. Most of the time, they get a percentage of their salary, too!

    Here? Six weeks and you're lucky if you have a job when you go back. Hmmn.


  • fleur...
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    fleurdelys3110

    November 30, 2012 at 10:54 AM

    ^^And they pay through the nose for that, Viridian.


  • qwerty
    -- Nonmember comment from

    qwerty

    November 30, 2012 at 10:55 AM
    I'm surprised we did as well as we did!
  • Taylo...
    -- Facebook comment from

    Taylor Askerzada

    November 30, 2012 at 11:04 AM

    Can I get a citation? I mean, it's not that this isn't a completely believable list, sounds pretty accurate, I'd just like to see it myself :)  As for America, there are pros and cons to everything.  I'd just like a better understanding of how this list was made and what exact information was used to place each state....for instance,when you say geography, what does that in tel?  Does that mean it's based off of where it's easier to breath based on pollution and pressure, or does it mean where there is more sunshine to promote less depression and more vitamin d....I mean, it's just a pretty general blog you've got posted without a lot of information about this list....making me curious.  Very good topic though!


  • TTC2Long
    --

    TTC2Long

    November 30, 2012 at 11:12 AM
    Mhm. All countries with socialized medicine. Weird.
  • Jamie...
    -- Facebook comment from

    Jamie Lechner

    November 30, 2012 at 11:53 AM

    Am I surprised? Not in the least. I've read the studies and we are the only "civilized" nation without nationalized healthcare for our citizens. That's a BIG deal! How do you expect to rank anywhere NEAR the top when your people can't access heathcare for the most part?
    In addition, our schools rank as sub-par, another biggy when you're talking about a child's future. 


  • Chris...
    -- Facebook comment from

    Chris German

    November 30, 2012 at 12:06 PM
    How is this list being created? What makes one country better than the other? Where are you getting the info? What is your ranking system? Till you tell us, this information you are showing us is nothing...
  • Karen
    -- Nonmember comment from

    Karen

    November 30, 2012 at 12:12 PM
    The link is in the article, but here it is again: http://www.economist.com/news/21566430-where-be-born-2013-lottery-life
1-10 of 20 comments

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