Postpartum Depression Can Have a Strange Effect on Your Baby's Appearance

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height chartBecause there isn't enough pressure on new moms already, here's something else to stress us sleep-deprived, semi-neurotic, Google-obsessed women out: If we're not super happy and perfect and positively delighted with ourselves and our babies 24:7 during the first nine months of their lives, they'll be short.

Yep. No longer are we merely responsible for our children's overall happiness, health, safety, and IQ-levels. We're now responsible for their height, as well. Yes, their height! No pressure there, mamas.

Well, those aren't the words exactly, but a new study published in Pediatrics claims that children with moms who say they experienced even mild depressive symptoms nine months after giving birth had a 40 percent higher chance of falling below the 10th percentile in height at age 4. Awesome! Especially since the study's author added: "Physical growth is one of the most important indicators of early childhood health and has long-term consequences for well-being."

To be honest, not sure how much I buy into this study, as there are plenty of short kids out there who are little just because their parents are. Isn't height, um, a little bit genetic? I'm sure there are mothers out there who have been the happiest, most chipper, non-depressive women on earth -- and who have short kids. Heck, I even know a few.

So, let's not go into mass hysteria over these findings -- seriously, new moms have enough on their plates. If women are experiencing postpartum depression, let them just focus on doing what they can -- without worrying that their mood is going to make their kid short. And let's also hope that one day a study will come out that says: Ground-breaking new research shows that the only thing little babies need in their lives is love! Yes, it's very Beatles-esque, but it's true! Simply love your little one to pieces and everything in their lives will be fine! Everything else is just nonsense!

What do you think of this study?


Image via Joelk75/Flickr

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