steve jobs and bill gatesParenthood. It's all so new. Here you are, with this little wee one you had only a few months ago. You feel like you are getting the hang of it, getting your groove as a mom, at least as far as feedings and diapering and all of that stuff goes.

You are learning the ins and outs of parenthood, but you know there's a lot more. You subscribe to every parenting magazine, check out the gazillion mom websites, read parenting book after parenting book to be sure you're on top of this whole mom thing.

Little did you know you should be reading how billionaires made their billions. Yup, the advice on how to make a fortune from Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, and Steve Jobs is perfect parenting advice

Okay, I admit, it's an odd place to find parenting advice. But, if you look at how three of the richest men in the world made their fortunes, how they approach their businesses, their work, it's actually fantastic advice on how to be a great parent.

Bill Gates -- Everyone knows Bill Gates' story: he famously dropped out of Harvard to start what is now Microsoft. He had spent his youth preparing for this, he figured out things on his own, learned from trying, experimenting in his garage. He didn't need a formal education to start his business. He already knew what he had to do, so he followed his gut and dropped out. How does this apply to you as a mom? Trust your mommy instincts. Nobody else is going to know what's best for your baby. I know this is true: my daughter was acting fussy and just not right. She didn't have a fever or anything, but I knew something was up. Sure enough, even though she didn't have any of the tell-tale signs, she had an ear infection. I knew something wasn't right, and my gut told me so.

Steve Jobs -- In his commencement address to Stanford University graduates in 2005, the founder of Apple said: 

When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like: 'If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you'll most certainly be right.' It made an impression on me, and since then, for the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: 'If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?' And whenever the answer has been 'No' for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.

What's a mom to do with this? This is ideal to remember when you are struggling with the work-life balance, part of every mom's life. Sure, we all have some Days From Hell, when you drop all of the balls you're juggling. But, if, after a while, you have many days of dropped balls, the way you are juggling isn't working. You have to make a change. Don't be afraid to change it up.

Warren Buffett -- The CEO of Berkshire Hathaway has given lots of business advice over the years, and one of them is "Never suck your thumb." Now, he's not advocating pacifiers, he's not saying find another way to self-soothe. Nope, he's talking about how to stop thinking and start acting. It is easy as a mom to get caught up in tracking each milestone or to already be worried about the next stage your daughter will hit. While you are worrying and thinking, those moments will pass you by. At some point, you have to just be a mom. Enjoy your child at whatever stage she's at, be with the kiddo right in front of you -- being present, staying in the moment, in tune with your kid, that is going to make anything you may think about so much easier to deal with.

Where is the oddest place you have found great parenting advice?

 

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