I've had recurrent miscarriages. Will I be able to have a baby? Pregnancy Loss

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After having multiple miscarriages, many women find themselves wondering about their odds of carrying a future pregnancy to term. Here, a doctor explains the chances of having future miscarriages, and women who've had recurrent losses explain their own next steps.

Get a Full Evaluation

"The likelihood of having another miscarriage after three consecutive miscarriages is about 30 to 45 percent, versus approximately 30 percent after two miscarriages. Although the risk is higher, the chance of having a normal pregnancy is still greater than having another miscarriage even after multiple losses. Evaluation is key and [a woman with three or more miscarriages] will need to undergo a recurrent pregnancy loss work-up including parental...

"The likelihood of having another miscarriage after three consecutive miscarriages is about 30 to 45 percent, versus approximately 30 percent after two miscarriages. Although the risk is higher, the chance of having a normal pregnancy is still greater than having another miscarriage even after multiple losses. Evaluation is key and [a woman with three or more miscarriages] will need to undergo a recurrent pregnancy loss work-up including parental karyotypes; uterine evaluation via hysterosalpinogram, saline sonohysterogram and/or hysteroscopy; thyroid evaluation; prolactin and fasting glucose or hemoglobin A1C levels; screening for anticardiolipin antibodies, anti B2 glycoprotein I and lupus anticoagulant." -- Sunny Jun, MD, cofounder and comedical director of CCRM San Francisco

Immune Disorders Can Cause Miscarriage

"Ask your reproductive endocrinologist [RE] about any immune disorders and if seeing a rheumatologist might help. I think the test that they used to start looking into it for me was a blood test where I had a positive ANA titer. It was that and the elevated natural killer calls that most worried my RE."

Sometimes, a Second Opinion Is in Order

"Try to get a second opinion. I was lucky enough to have an RE in the family that looked over my file and agreed with my RE's treatment plan. That helped me to feel like we had looked at everything."

Treatment Varies

"I've had three miscarriages and no testing, but with our last pregnancy, they put me on baby aspirin and progesterone until 16 weeks. It worked."

Ovulation Can Be a Factor

 "We found out my ovulation cycle was wacky. Apparently it happens as you get older or when your body experiences some kind of trauma. I was given Femara (letrozole)."

Some Choose to Stop Trying

"My last miscarriage was at 36, and then I said no more. It was too hard. There is no shame in saying that you've spent enough time, money, and heartache and [are] stopping treatment. You don't have to continue. I know it feels like you do, but you don't. There are other ways to have a child. Or not. We decided to just not be parents. We're awesome as uncle and aunt, though."

Some Keep Trying with Success

"You can get you and your partner genetically tested. It could be because of unhealthy egg or sperm or both. I had two D&C procedures back to back. I was 41 at the time. I was told that 40 or fewer healthy eggs remain. There was not enough tissue either time to test. I told my husband, 'Let's try once more for a baby.' We did and are lucky -- our baby is healthy and due this November."

The advice on CafeMom aims to educate, inform, and provide a range of solutions to the issues moms care about. It is not a substitute for consultation with a medical professional or treatment for a specific condition. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem without consulting a qualified professional. Please contact your health-care provider with questions and concerns.