My 1-year-old doesn't have any teeth yet. Should I worry? Teeth & Tooth Care

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Some babies get teeth later than others. If you're concerned because your 1-year-old hasn't broken that first tooth yet, you'll want to check out this advice from a pediatrician and moms who've been there.

See the Pediatrician First

"There is a wide spectrum for a first tooth to appear; 7 to 8 months is the average. Some babies young as 5 months will have some early eruptions. I want to see the first tooth erupting by around 12 to 18 months -- that window.

"If there's no teeth at 18 to 24 months, there ought to be some concern. There are some genetic conditions or a systemic delay that could cause teeth to erupt late.

"Under the age of 2, starting out at the pediatrician is the best bet. There are also pediatric dentists...

"There is a wide spectrum for a first tooth to appear; 7 to 8 months is the average. Some babies young as 5 months will have some early eruptions. I want to see the first tooth erupting by around 12 to 18 months -- that window.

"If there's no teeth at 18 to 24 months, there ought to be some concern. There are some genetic conditions or a systemic delay that could cause teeth to erupt late.

"Under the age of 2, starting out at the pediatrician is the best bet. There are also pediatric dentists that can have a good look at the teeth. But generally speaking, going to the pediatrician first is the way to go, because they will take into consideration your child's medical history, which dentists don't have." -- Christina Johns, MD, MEd, FAAP, senior medical advisor, PM Pediatrics, Lake Success, NY

Be Patient

"My youngest daughter was 15 months before she got her first tooth. Our dentist was a friend of ours, and I kept asking him if she was ever going to get her teeth. He kept assuring me she would. Then she didn't lose a tooth until she was over 7."

It May Not Be Worrisome

"My daughter was 16 months old when she got her first tooth. She never has had any problems."

Consider Getting the Teeth Checked

"My child is 15 months old, and still no teeth. No problems so far; we will have to see a dentist at 18 months though if she still doesn’t have any then."

Teeth May Come in Late but Fast

"My oldest child cut her first teeth at 18 months. Four at once! She got another four shortly thereafter."

It's Not Always in the Same Order

"My oldest got her first tooth at 12 months. And my youngest was 15 months and she broke a molar first!"

Sometimes, Intervention Is Necessary

"My youngest daughter had issues with her teeth coming in on time or even at all. Some baby teeth had to be pulled, as well as four adult teeth, to make room in her mouth."

It Depends on the Kid

"My son turns 1 next week and is just getting his first tooth. My daughter got hers around 6 months. Every kid is different."

Get Peace of Mind

"My middle daughter didn't have any teeth at 15 months old. We brought her to the dentist to check, and they assured us they were there waiting. At 16 months, they broke through eight at once and then others staggered in slowly. It was so miserable for us all. Nothing could ease her discomfort."

The advice on CafeMom aims to educate, inform, and provide a range of solutions to the issues moms care about. It is not a substitute for consultation with a medical professional or treatment for a specific condition. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem without consulting a qualified professional. Please contact your health-care provider with questions and concerns.